Fisking from the Folger – Old News With Timely Relevance

Fisking is the practice of printing someone else’s writing with comments and rebuttals to the original opinion stated.

As we contemplate life without print newspapers as we’ve known them, and as everyone from ferry agencies to delicatessens publish print newsletters, the exhibit at the Folger Library in Washington D.C. offers the comforting thought that journalism is evolving, not dying. A new era of accessibility, (including comfort and reflection) and interactivity is dawning in civic journalism.

Regarding these developments, Philip Kennicott, Washington Post Staff Writer wrote on Monday, January 5, 2009:

If you learn about the world primarily from newspapers, the Folger Shakespeare Library‘s exhibition documenting the birth of journalism in the Renaissance will be a wistful affair. It’s like looking at baby pictures of a distinguished old relative who is now on life support. Look how vibrant, how youthful, how full of vinegar the old man was. Once upon a time, before the plummeting circulation, the shrinking ad revenue and the highly leveraged corporate owners.

But if you get your news primarily from the Internet, there’s nothing sad here at all.  Continue reading